SPRING HAS SPRUNG: THE NO-NONSENSE GUIDE TO AN EFFECTIVE SPRING CLEAN

(May 06, 2014)



With the arrival of spring and the warmer temperatures, I always feel that it is a great time to complete a full, all-around cleaning of my home. It's a chance to throw open the windows, breathe in the fresh air, and listen to the birds chirp as you set to work on tossing away any clutter and washing down everything that's in need of a little TLC. However, before you get started, having a clear plan of action could make all the difference between a difficult clean and an easy one. To help yours go as smoothly as possible, here's a no-nonsense guide to completing an effective spring clean throughout your home. 

Make a Detailed List to Establish Your Plan of Attack

One way to avoid becoming overwhelmed or flustered during the course of your spring clean is to establish a list of exactly which rooms in your home need cleaning and the order in which you intend to complete them. This way you'll have a very clear and concise plan of action that will direct your progress. The worst thing you could do would be to just jump straight into the cleaning process, going from room to room trying to get everything done all at once without any sense of what actually needs to be achieved. So before you do anything, establish a list of the rooms you need to work on, and then go through to each one to identify specific areas of focus. For example, your bathroom may only need a general scrub down, whereas your living room may require the removal or organization of clutter in addition to a general washing of the floor and other surfaces. Once you've established a vivid picture in your head of the extent of the work that's ahead of you, from there you can gather your supplies and begin with the first room on your list.

Once You've Started, Take Everything One Room at a Time

Another strategy to ensure a comprehensive cleaning of your home is to take the entire process one room at a time. If you plan on starting with your kitchen, tell yourself that you aren't going to move on to any other part of your home until the kitchen itself is completely clean and clutter free. Not only will this force you to finish the entire job for every individual room, but it will also provide a motivating sense of satisfaction once you've worked your way through a certain area. You'll be able to step back and see the clear signs of all your effort right there in front of you, with items organized and surfaces polished, and this should push you to want to achieve the same result in every other room on your list.

Clean From the Top and Work Your Way Down

For each room you step into, you want to start your cleaning regimen from the top and work your way down from there. This will ensure that no area gets missed and will provide you with a clear sense of direction no matter how bad a particular room may seem. In that regard, the top of any room is always the ceiling, and that's where you can start off each time by either wiping or vacuuming away any cobwebs or dust clumps. Then you can move on to your furniture and appliances, which might entail tasks like scrubbing down surfaces, washing or vacuuming upholstery, removing stains, polishing glass, metal, and wood, etc. Once that's done, the floor is your last area of focus. It's also important to note that if the room in question has clutter you plan on removing or organizing, then tackling this first before starting your top down clean is the most efficient way to proceed.

Spring cleaning is an excellent way to organize your home and give it a genuine "good as new" feel. The process itself though, contrary to popular belief, doesn't have to be complicated or difficult, as least as long as you follow this clear guide for getting the most effective results. By following these steps, you'll be surprised at how smoothly your spring clean goes this year. I'm off to get out the bucket, find my cloths and get the water sudsy. I always feel so much better with my home in order, I hope that this helps you feel the same.

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